Saturday, May 23, 2009

Ketimus (steamed grated tapioca on banana leaf)


If you are trying to avoid fried food and want to eat a healthy snack in the middle of a day on the streets in Jakarta, then, you can try to look for this kind of cart. Yes, this cart definitely is offering healthy snack because everything is steamed ;)

There are steamed peanuts, steamed banana, steamed sweet potato and Ketimus on this cart.

Those men who sell these steamed food are called Tukang Bajigur because their main selling is actually the drink called Bajigur. Sorry, I didn't get the chance to capture the drink because it was sold out already. Next time, I'll post the Bajigur drink which is coffee mixed with brown sugar - palm sugar/gula jawa, coconut milk, salt and arenga pinnata fruit.


Do you wonder how ketimus looks in the inside? ;)

How to make Ketimus:

Ingredients:
500 gr tapioca (grated)
150 gr old coconut (grated)
150 gr young coconut (sliced)
200 gr brown sugar (palm sugar/ gula jawa)
1 tsp salt

For wrapping:
5 Pandan leaves (cut into 4 cm)
2 Banana leaves (cut banana leaves in pieces of approx. 15 cm square)

Directions:
- Mix and stir well the grated tapioca altogether with the other ingredients
- Prepare the banana leaf
- Spoon 2 heaped tablespoons of the mixture on top of banana leaf
- Put the pandan leaf in the middle of the mixture
- Fold both sides of the package to the center
- Steamed the ketimus for 30 minutes

Tada.... This is Ketimus! :)

While ketimus is being steamed, usually you can smell the nice fragrant from the pandan leaf.

How does Ketimus tasted? It's sweet from the brown sugar, rich from the coconut and has chewy texture from the grated tapioca. It's a nice and healthy snack :)

71 comments:

  1. Mmmm, ketimus looks delicious!

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  2. MMMMM...that looks delicious! I have never tried it, but now I will have to make this,....

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  3. Ketimus looks like our Tapioca cake albeit much smoother-must be tasty.

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  4. Selba, I love to visit here. You take me to another world of taste and flavor and that makes me very happy.

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  5. mica: You will like it if you like chewy texture :)

    sophie: You are going to make it? That's great :)

    foodbin: tapioca cake? Ah.. I wonder how it looks and tasted :)

    mary: Mary, it's really an honor for me to know that my posts can make you very happy :)

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  6. Indeed an eye-opener seeing carts selling steamed items. Thanks for introducing it :)

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  7. I love when you share your pictures. Those dish are all new to me.

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  8. This does look like a healthy snack and yummy too.

    That Bajigur sounds delicious too!

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  9. i think here called "Lepat Ubi"
    i didn't eat for very long time already

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  10. Healthy and delicious! Love steam food. Haven't heard of Bajigur before, wonder how it tastes like and if they have it in Msia...

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  11. The ketimus looks great, and I'm eager to read your post on bajigur -- it sounds so exotic to me!

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  12. coffee mixed with brown sugar - palm sugar/gula jawa, coconut milk, salt and arenga pinnata fruit?
    it is an indonesian specialty??

    Heehe..so this vendor is not called "steamed man"?? ;p

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  13. I am just fascinated by all your taste treats! This looks just fantastic...

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  14. I would likely have to be forcefully removed from the Steamed Cart Man! Steamed bananas and sweet potatoes: I'm there!

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  15. ck lam: Do people in Malaysia also eat the same steamed food like in Indonesia?

    helene: Glad to share the pictures, Helene :)

    monica: If you are a coffee lover then you probably would love to drink this Bajigur ;)

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  16. pisang goring: Oh… some people also use the word “Lepet” for steamed food. You call “ubi” for tapioca in Malaysia? In Indonesia, ubi means sweet potato :)

    sugar bean: I don’t think that you can find Bajigur in Malaysia because this drink is an authentic drink from West Java :)

    sapuche: The best place to have Bajigur is in Bandung – capital of West Java, the cool weather is perfect for the drink :)

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  17. TNG: Yes, that drink is called as Bajigur, an authentic drink from West Java. No, the man is called as the Bajigur drink man instead of steamed man, hehehe…

    unconfidentialcook: There are so many varieties :)

    marta: Hahaha… I can tell directly that you are a big fan of steamed food :)

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  18. The ketimus lookos so nice especially the color!

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  19. I'd like to try a taste of that! I bet it's yummy Thanks for showing us so much variety :)

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  20. MTH: Wait until you try it! ;)

    glo: Can you find coconut and tapioca easily around your area? If yes, maybe you can give it a try to make it your own :)

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  21. anything cooked in banana leaf is extra nice :D

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  22. noobcook: totally agreed with you :)

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  23. steamed and healthy we like ! Dun think a comparable steaming version is available here in KL !

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  24. BSG: Oh.. How's the steaming food in KL?

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  25. Simple and nice! I love reading all your street finds...but they always make me hungry! >P

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  26. wa .. so healthy yar.. all dat steamed food (yucks!)

    just kidding, eating healthy is good of course! (but temptations in KL are many la, i tell you ,and me, im only human!)

    ps/ just had yarcharkwai for suppa.. yums

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  27. I love these street vendor carts.They remind me of growing up as a child in Thailand.

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  28. Ketimus looks like our lepat pisang with banana instead. Was it yummy?

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  29. Yum, the Ketimus looks delicious! I like the idea of steamed banana and sweet potatoes too - what a great snack!

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  30. yeah .
    but sweet potato we call it
    "ubi keledek"

    some called it ubi too

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  31. Hi Selba!
    For the oat bread, if you don't have a breadmaker, you can make it with these instructions:
    1) Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl (except for yeast)
    2) Combine yeast, brown sugar (or honey - it'd probably dissolve better), butter/margarine, and warm water in a separate bowl. Mix until dissolved and let it sit for a couple minutes until creamy.
    3) Add yeast mixture to dry ingredients.
    4) After kneading the dough for a while (10-15 minutes or so), leave to rise until it was just over double the size.
    5) Punch it down.
    6) Put dough into bread pan and left to rise again.
    7) Bake in the oven for 35 minutes at 350 degrees.

    (my bread maker let it rise and punched it down twice, but i think one time may be sufficient).

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  32. bangsar-babe: Hehehe… thanks, Bangsar-babe!

    cumi & ciki: Hahaha… can not tahan with steamed food? Whoa… yar char kwai? *drools*

    gregorio: Hi Gregorio, thanks for dropping by my blog! Wow, you grew up in Thailand, must be really interesting :)

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  33. jencooks: Oh… probably the lepat pisang is the same thing like our “kue pisang” which is made for rice flour? Yes, yummy indeed :)

    pisang goreng: ubi keledek? Hehehe.. that’s cute… if the “K” changed to “G”, Geledek means storm in bahasa Indonesia.

    pearl: Pearl, thank you so much for the oat bread instruction! This is really great, definitely will try to make this oat bread someday :)

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  34. Been hearing so much about the banana leaf lately. I will have to try and use them.

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  35. donna-ffw: That's great :)Is it easy to find banana leaves in your area?

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  36. Hmmm...I luv all these steamed food! Yummy!

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  37. FFT: It's healthy snacks, no need to worry about cholesterol ;)

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  38. Geledek?
    sodesneh......
    no wonder when I watch INdon show when they say geledek
    i thought it means tickle>.....
    XD

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  39. I learn something new every time I visit your site! This dish looks so interesting and unique.

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  40. I like the peanut shots as I never seen the peanut that way. The ketimus look smooth.

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  41. funny how you name them all as Tukang. :)
    sounds like some craftwork ppl.

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  42. wow... look at the similarity of the ketimus and the suman of the philippines... :) your pic looks so inviting...

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  43. this reminds me of the rice dumpling we make for the dragonboat festival! and for the sweet ones, we'll dip it in egg custard (kaya). delish!

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  44. This one I know how does it taste. :)

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  45. Very unique, a new dish to me, I would love the coconut flavor - yum!

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  46. steam banana? Just to make it warm?

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  47. pisang goreng: LOL, when tickle is “gelitik” in bahasa Indonesia. You like watching Indonesian program… uhmmm is it soap opera which we called sinetron? ;)

    sara: I’m happy that I can share something new to you :)

    food paradise: the peanuts still got their stem  Ah.. although the ketimus looks smooth but got texture of the grated tapioca.

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  48. j2kfm: Here in Indonesia, not only carpenter is addressed with “tukang” but everyone who use their “skills” are addressed as “tukang” :)

    mikky: Hi Mikky, welcome to my blog. I saw the suman in your blog and it does look the same but different ingredients :)

    nic: Rice dumpling as bakcang? I would love to the dragonboat festival :)

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  49. little inbox: Really? Where did you try it? :)

    5 star foodie: You might love it, have to try it ;)

    mimid3vils: No, the banana were being steamed for about 30 minutes, it’s yummy ;)

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  50. I have never had this before but it looks so good, I would love to try it.

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  51. katherine aucoin: That's great! Let me know how you like it :)

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  52. great photos - great education and now I want ketimus

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  53. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  54. doggybloggy: Thanks for the compliment :)

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  55. well I forgot the title.....
    and I watch from pay per view TV

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  56. A great post, Selba. I love to learn about street foods in exotic places. I hope to be able to try them someday.

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  57. pisang goreng: Oic... you like Indonesian shows?

    cathy: Thanks, Cathy :) Hopefully, you can visit Indonesia someday, a lot of interesting places to see and also food to try.

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  58. Wonderful photos! I'd love to have a taste of all the food. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

    Paz

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  59. wow, this looks really delicious!!!! one please!

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  60. paz: Hi Paz, welcome to my blog and thank you for your compliments, hope to see you again here :)

    sakaigirl: *hands one ketimus* :)

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  61. I like the idea of steamed instead of fried - great.

    When we lived in the islands we had banana trees in our yard and used the leaves for wrapping things to grill. Now we live in the mountains and can't find banana leaves anywhere and I miss them.
    Sam

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  62. I like tapioca for its texture and when steamed makes good desserts!

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  63. MCK: Ah... too bad that banana trees can not grown in 4 seasons countries. Food that got wrapped by banana leaves have a nice aroma :)

    worldwindows: Tapioca is nice for snack or dessert, like it too :)

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  64. I like the little figure smiling at your ketimus :)

    Looks good, I love seeing all the food carts. Here, in southern United States, boiled peanuts are very popular. I've never tried them steamed...

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  65. tavolini: Hehehe... the figure is smiling to the readers. Do you eat boiled peanuts a lot? It's a healthy snack :)

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  66. It's great to have options for snacks between fried and steamed. Never tried ketimus, but it looks easy to make. Thanks for sharing.

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  67. MTC: Hopefully, you can make it someday :)

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  68. I'm a little late in commenting here, but I had to say that this is fabulous. What an interesting snack! It has to be delicious. I've never had the opportunity to try ketimus before, but we have everything to make it in Brazil so I will have to give it a shot.

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  69. lori: don't worry Lori, there's no late in commenting :)
    ah... that's great if you can give it a shot!

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