Monday, April 20, 2009

Rujak Juhi (Cuttlefish Salad)

After a little break from my street food posts, now I'm back again with the Rujak (Indonesian fruit salad) post :)

Rujak Juhi is another kind of rujak but although the name is rujak, it doesn't contain of any fruits except if cucumber is consider as a fruit.

Juhi means salted cuttlefish in Indonesian language.



The ingredients:

From left to right: Lettuce, cucumber, fried boiled potatoes, cabbages,noodles, fried tofu,


From left to right: peanut sauce (made from ground fried peanut, garlic, hot chili, shallot, sugar, salt, vinegar, water, sweet soybean sauce), fried shreddered cuttlefish, and kaffir lime.

You can ask Rujak Juhi for a "take-out".


Sweet soysauce and kaffir lime juice.

Final touch, kerupuk (shrimp crakers/chips) on the top plus hot red chili sauce on the side. Yummy! :)

A plate of Rujak Juhi costs Rp. 9.000
Currency:
1 USD = Rp. 10.800
1 MYR = Rp. 3.000

49 comments:

  1. wow "sedup" so delicious. so tempting, you are such a tempting madamme lol! nice one!

    ReplyDelete
  2. BBO: Hahaha... thanks for the compliment ;P

    ReplyDelete
  3. Other than the similar sounding but diff spellings the food is so like KL but so unique and so Indon !
    bet its better than a lot of similar but 10x more expensive Japanese/Taiwanese tidbits !

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, this sounds delicious in all the right ways--sweet, salty, crunchy, spicy! I want some NOW!

    ReplyDelete
  5. not a fan of cuttlefish. but looks decent enough!

    ReplyDelete
  6. BSG: So Indo? Hehehe... Probably this one is more likely Msian rojak, ya?

    pearl: It's really tempting? Hehehe...

    mica: I wish I can send it to you by DHL! LOL

    j2kfm: Can eat this rujak without the cuttlefish ;)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Ooo, it looks a little different from the Malaysian version. Would love to try it out!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Mmm, everything looks totally delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  9. sugar bean: The one is Msia also got cuttlefish, right?

    elyse: It's delicious indeed :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. i tried tis b4 at medan ..is tat same ? but tat one no have cuttlefish jus fried prwan cake n veggie..

    ReplyDelete
  11. faye fly: I don't think it's the same as in Medan because this rujak is an authentic rujak from Jakarta :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I can see the crowd, must be really good. Is that noodles on the plate?

    ReplyDelete
  13. worldwindows: Yes, very crowded. It's yellow noodles :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. This reminds me of Malaysian rojak mee. And I love kerupuk! =)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Sounds excellent - would love to try!

    ReplyDelete
  16. wow... with noodles.... never try it but seems very spicy. ^o^

    ReplyDelete
  17. Everything looks so wonderful and fresh!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love these posts because I enjoy learning about new types of food!

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a hearty and delicious salad. We need more street food here in Portland.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Nice! I have been trying to find cuttlefish around here and zero luck. sniff sniff.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I can almost taste this! I imagine how great the sweet, tangy, salty flavors must come together for a fabulous salad!

    I am not sure where to get cuttle fish, I wonder if I could substitute another kind of fish.

    Thanks for finding my blog and for the nice comments!

    ReplyDelete
  22. you make me drooling lar.....

    here we use kangkung also in dish

    ReplyDelete
  23. Yarghle...drool.... sorry, I think I drooled all over your lovely pics.

    Everything there looks so scrumptious!!!

    ReplyDelete
  24. This looks so good, but I'm confused. Why is it called fruit salad if there isn't any fruit in there?

    ReplyDelete
  25. i think it's called juhu here...but it's hokkien and i'm cantonese, so i'm not so sure..hehehehe...

    yummy stuff! salty cuttlefish with sweet vegetables and a tangy dressing. ohhh, peanut sauce for the aroma..yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  26. This looks delicious. I have never had cuttlefish... must be time. I love the mixture of ingredients.... mmmm.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Delicious. I love all the pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  28. bangsar-babe: There’s rojak mee in Msia? Whoaaa… must be nice :)

    5 star foodie: Hopefully, you can try it someday :)

    food paradise: Rujak juhi isn’t so spicy like the other rujaks :)

    Katherine aucoin: And yummy ;)

    sara: I’m glad to share these authentic street food posts :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. pam: Believe it or not, most of the time, street food tasted better than food in restaurant :)

    jeff: Ah… too bad, maybe try to find it in Chinatown or Japanese store near your area?

    the ungourmet: Hi the ungourmet, welcome to my blog. Hmmm… I’m not sure whether you can substitute the cuttlefish because it has its own aroma and texture (very different than other fish). I believe you can find cuttlefish in Chinatown or Japanese store. Good luck!

    pisang goreng: Kangkung in rujak? Here in Indonesia, there’s another rujak called Rujak cingur with ox nose as the main ingredient, also got kangkung in it :)

    sam’s mistress: Hahaha… no worries, it dry up quickly!

    ReplyDelete
  30. monica h: Hehehe… I’m also confused!

    nic: Juhu? Eh.. Maybe the word “Juhi” came from that word? What’s the word in Cantonese?
    Nic, seriously… I think I really need to learn from you how to describe food! :)

    Claudia: Give a try to salted cuttlefish, it’s also nice for a snack :)

    helene: Thank you, Helene :)

    ReplyDelete
  31. foodie with little thyme: *drool*

    ReplyDelete
  32. I've never eaten cuttlefish, but this definitely makes me want to try it.

    ReplyDelete
  33. catherine: the cuttlefish salad is yummy :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. How fascinating, I love learning about other cultures food!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Everything looks so lovely.. I have not seen cuttlefish here to try:( Gorgeous photos.

    ReplyDelete
  36. donna-ffw: Do you have Chinatown in your area? Usually, they will sell dried cuttlefish :)

    ReplyDelete
  37. an odd combination dish but it looks tasty with extra Kerupuk!

    ReplyDelete
  38. foodbin: Odd? Hehehe.. you gotta try it first! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  39. This is a street snack I could really get addicted to. Well, this and all the other rujaks you've shared! Looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  40. sapuche: You like cuttlefish? :)

    ReplyDelete
  41. I love cuttlefish! I've had it a lot in Vietnam and Japan. :)

    ReplyDelete
  42. sapuche: Great! Then you definitely will love this cuttlefish salad :)

    ReplyDelete
  43. Indo Language sounds similair to malaysian. Rujak sounds Rojak, & Juhi sounds "Juhu" means cuttlefish in hokkien...haha.

    I guess this Rujak Juhi is a similar version to Pasembor in malaysia. Pasembor basically have cucumber, turnip, prawn fritter, taukua & potato. and many more additional ingrediants such as squid, big prawn, hard boiled egg...etc

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hello,


    We bumped into your blog and we really liked it - great recipes YUM! YUM!.
    We would like to add it to the Petitchef.com.

    We would be delighted if you could add your blog to Petitchef so that our users can, as us,
    enjoy your recipes.

    Petitchef is a french based Cooking recipes Portal. Several hundred Blogs are already members
    and benefit from their exposure on Petitchef.com.

    To add your site to the Petitchef family you can use http://en.petitchef.com/?obj=front&action=site_ajout_form or just go to Petitchef.com and click on "Add your site"

    Best regards,

    Vincent
    petitchef.com

    ReplyDelete
  45. gill gill: Hi Gill, thanks for stopping by my blog.

    Yes, Indonesian language and Malay language is quite similiar because it comes from the same root :)

    Wow... the Pasembor sounds so delicious!

    camelia: Hi Camelia, thanks for bumping into my blog :) I'll check out your site.

    ReplyDelete
  46. It did look like the combination of our mee jawa and pasembur and did not look anything like our rojak. :P

    http://crizfood.com/

    ReplyDelete
  47. criz lai: Yup, even for us Indonesian, we are confused why at the first place it's called as rujak since there's no fruit (except if you consider cucumber is a fruit), hehehe...

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin Related Stories Widget for Blogs