Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Rujak (Fruit Salad) and an award

For the coming posts, I think I will concentrate to blog about Indonesian fruit salad which is well known as Rujak :)

There are several kind of rujaks in Indonesia.

So far, I already posted 2 kind of rujak before which are:
- "Rujak Cingur" which contains the slices of cooked buffalo's or cow's nose, if you are interested to read it, please click HERE .
- "Rujak Tumbuk" or "Rujak Bèbèk" which is a mashed fruit salad. You can click HERE to read it. However since the pictures was taken in a mall; therefore, I will blog the one that is being sold on the streets.

For today post it will be:- The "Ordinary Rujak" and I'm posting it together with "Rujak Serut" (shredded rujak).

The coming posts of rujak beside the "Rujak Tumbuk" will be:
- "Rujak Juhi" contains of salted cuttlefish (juhi) as the top ingredient.
- "Rujak Potong" is rujak of limited fruit and usually eaten with mixed salt and ground red chili.

Then there are other rujak that I might post someday, i.e:
- "Rujak Pengantin" (bridegroom rujak) which is more like gado-gado with mayonnaise as an extra ingredient in the the peanut sauce.
- "Rujak Shanghai" is a rujak created by the Indonesian Chinese community. The main ingredients are cuttlefish (cumi-cumi) and sea cucumber (teripang). The peanut sauce is mixed with pineapple juice.
- "Rujak Petis" (shrimp paste rujak).


Okiedokie... Now, let's start with the ordinary Rujak :)

The wooden cart of Rujak.


The preparation of cutting the fruits.
tukang rujak

The common fruits in ordinary rujak are water apple (jambu air), raw mangoes (mangga muda), jicama (bangkoang), pineapple (nanas), raw sweet potato (ubi merah), cucumber (ketimun), ambarella (kedondong), local green apple (apel Malang) and pomelo (jeruk Bali).


As you can see on the top, there's a big ice cube to keep the fruits fresh and cold.

The main dressing for this Rujak is this sweet sour tick spicy peanut sauce made from ground brown/coconut sugar (gula jawa ), crushed fried peanuts (kacang goreng), tamarin water (air asam jawa), stone banana (pisang batu), shrimp paste (terasi ), red chili (cabe merah) and lobi-lobi.



Stone Banana (Pisang Batu)

Grind the stone banana together with salt

Add Lobi-lobi (I'm not so sure what's the name in English. It looks like cherry but got several tiny seed inside it and tasted sour)

Usually the fruits in Rujak are cut into bite-sized.

But then, we also have the shedder ones called "Rujak Serut"


The fruits are sheddered into thin slices.

The final look of the ordinary rujak with the brown sugar sauce plus crashed peanut.


Oh.. btw, Sam from My Carolina Kitchen has passed me this Sisterhood Award. Thank you so much, Sam!



The Sisterhood Award is an award from bloggers to bloggers in recognition of a blog spot which shows attitude and/or gratitude.

I would love to pass this award to:
- Katherine Aucoin from Smokey Mountain Cafe
- Mica from Mica Pie
- Pearl from fresh&pure- Burp and Slurp

Have a nice week ahead, everyone! :)

81 comments:

  1. Here in Malaysia, we called it as Rojak. Similar pronunciation but different spelling.

    ReplyDelete
  2. little inbox: Is the ingredients also the same?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Interesting way of preparing the sauce. And the end result looks delightful!

    ReplyDelete
  4. bangsar-babe: Plus, so refreshing eating it ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. thank you so much for the award! the fruit stand looks SO delish!

    ReplyDelete
  6. You have me salivating. Very appetising platter esp with pomelo added in. It is interesting that unripe stone banana is added in. The slightly bitter result on the sauce will give another dimension to this refreshing salad.

    ReplyDelete
  7. worldwindows: Ah.. you must have tried the stone banana before since you are familiar with the bitter taste :D

    ReplyDelete
  8. I never know there are so many variety of rojak in Indonesia, looks yummy....

    ReplyDelete
  9. ah king and moon: The different rujaks come from different regions in Indonesia :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. That's awesome! Very interesting post ... I'd like to try some!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I try this before! It taste almost like Malaysian rojak. But the sauce are so much different.

    ReplyDelete
  12. All of this Rujak looks amazing...some fruits I've never even seen! Love your photos, as well!

    ReplyDelete
  13. This looks so interesting and delicious! Thank you Selba for the Sisterhood award! I love visiting your blog and learning so much about your culture and cusine and I am honored that you are one of my blogging friends!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Such a delightful salad! Brown sugar sauce sounds so delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  15. That fruit salad looks delicious, mmmm. (Though I'm not sure what all the different fruits are.)

    Thank you for the lovely award!

    ReplyDelete
  16. there are THAT many varieties of Rujak over in Indon? great.

    but all the terms sound so foreign lah ... wonder how i can cope if going over in the future.

    ReplyDelete
  17. What a fasinating blog! I love learning about other cultures cuisine! Thanks for visiting my site, hope to see you again!

    ReplyDelete
  18. What an interesting combination of fruits, many of which I've never heard of! Your photos add so much for those of us who are unfamiliar with these dishes. Thanks :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Selby I am sorry if I offended you with my picture yesterday I know better my husband usually takes my pictures and he did not. Your fruit salad looks wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  20. another fruit i've never heard of! i always learn something with your posts :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. what a terrific combination of fruits, and that dressing sounds amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  22. This looks so refreshing! I learn something new each time I come here.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Wow....looks really refreshing! Certainly much better than our food rojak here.

    ReplyDelete
  24. It's nice to see pamelo being added as an ingredient in the rojak. It's not a basic ingredient over in our place.

    ReplyDelete
  25. What a rojak variety of rojak you have there...have only tried two types here in Spore Indian Rojak and Chinese usual rojak.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Oh, I love peanut sauce. That looks really tasty!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Thanks for stopping by.
    Your photos are wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  28. What an interesting post. Congratulations for the award.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I learn something new every day. I've never heard of or seen water apples or stone bananas- interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Very very interesting!! I have definitely learned a lot. Thank you for sharing. Your photos are amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  31. What a beautiful fruit salad - I love learning about your culture!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Lesley: You actually can make it by your own, it’s really easy and simple :)

    email2me: I would love to try the Malaysian rojak :)

    girlichef: It’s tropical fruits :)

    Katherine aucoin: You are welcome, Katherine. I’m also honored to have you as my blogging friend :)

    5 star foodie: The brown sugar can be really yummy if you mixed with other stuff like the tamarind water, salt and crushed peanuts :)

    ReplyDelete
  33. mica: Is there no Asian market that sells tropical fruit in your area? You are welcome, Mica :)

    j2kfm: Hahaha… well, the best it to try first our ordinary rujak ;)

    sarah herman: Hi Sarah, welcome to my blog! Hope to see you around :)

    glo: Thank you for your compliment on my photos :)

    netts nook: Oh… no, don’t worry about it, Lynette. I’m ok with it, I was just sharing the Chinese custom :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. heather: So happy to share our tropical fruits :)

    grace: If you get a chance, you need to try it :)

    mary: Yes, very refreshing from the fruit and also the sauce :)

    precious pea: Hahaha… really? I wonder how Malaysian rojak tasted

    ck lam: Pamelo is a really refreshing fruit :)

    ReplyDelete
  35. Unbelievable! What an amazing sauce that looks like on top of those fruits.

    Is air apple the pink things? What does it taste like?

    I didn't know you had jicama in SE Asia. I thought it was only a Mexican fruit - do you pronounce it hee-cama like we do over here?

    ReplyDelete
  36. jencooks: I tried the Indian rojak once but never tried the Chinese rojak, must try someday :)

    tavolini: It is really tasty especially because of the shrimp paste ;)

    foodie with little thyme!: Hi Foodie with little thyme, welcome to my blog and thanks for your compliment :)

    helene: Thank you, Helene :)

    ReplyDelete
  37. monica h: We have many kind of water apples. Maybe someday I will post it into more details :)

    ginger: Hello Ginger, welcome to my blog and please drop by again :)

    Kerstin: Thank you, Kerstin :)

    ReplyDelete
  38. rujak are always a good appetizer- ambarella will add a crunchy texture to it-good post

    ReplyDelete
  39. livie: Hahaha... it's water apple, not air apple! :D

    Air means water in Indonesia.

    Yup, the pink with white flesh is water apple (jambu air). We have many kind of water apples, mostly the colors are pink and green. I believe you would love water apple, it's juicy, sweet (sometimes a bit sour) and very crunchy.

    Jicama is known as "bangkoang" in Indonesian. I think the Indonesian are not aware that Jicama is actually a Mexican fruit because it's believe as our Indonesian native fruit. We even have a city known as the city of bangkoang in Sumatra.

    ReplyDelete
  40. foodbin: Thanks, Foodbin :)

    ReplyDelete
  41. interesting interesting..definitely different from msia rojak..this looks sour!

    ReplyDelete
  42. joe: Sour? Hahaha... No lah... especially with the sauce :P

    ReplyDelete
  43. always look fw to your interesting posts. i like the way the names of the dishes are similar to Malaysia, yet different! Preparation is so colorful!

    ReplyDelete
  44. The different fruits look wonderful--I've never seen any of them here in LA. Are those seeds in the stone banana? I bet this is so delicious, especially with that sauce!

    ReplyDelete
  45. cumi & ciki: Thanks! It also very interesting to know the names of food/fruits in bahasa Malay :)

    catherine: Hi Catherine, welcome to my blog :) Yes, the banana stone got a lot of seeds inside it which are hard as a stone, thus it called as banana stone.

    ReplyDelete
  46. high on fibre and taste...a really healhty meal, i think! i dont really fancy rojak but i must say the colourful fruits look good. ;D

    ReplyDelete
  47. Love the informative post and all the great photos. Can't say I've ever heard of Rujak before.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I'm amazed by the variety of ingredients used in this rujak. The peanut sauce sounds good, but even if it were missing I know I'd love the rujak anyway! Great photos, and thanks for sharing, Selba!

    ReplyDelete
  49. nic: True :) Oh.. but do you like eating fruits?

    jude: Hi Jude, thanks for dropping by my blog and your compliments :)

    sapuche: Hahaha… for people who love eating rujak, they know directly if an ingredient is lacking from the peanut sauce.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Congrats on your award, you so deserve it!! LOVE your photos aas always and your fruit salads look so refreshing and healthy!

    ReplyDelete
  51. YAY YAY YAY!!thanks for the award, Selby!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Holy cow, that looks wonderful.

    Thanks so much for sharing about the different things that are made where you live.

    I love seeing what other people like to eat!

    ReplyDelete
  53. very interesting la Selba! keep them coming! wahh..indo is really big on the rujak biz?? we here only 2 types! so i assume all the rujaks are completely diff in taste??

    ReplyDelete
  54. Very educational! I've never seen this fruit before.

    ReplyDelete
  55. This looks so refreshing! I wish I could try it someday. Indonesia definitely offers a great variety of delightful foodstuff!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Mmm, one day I will have to try water apples - the description sounds delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Delicious, rujak sounds like a intricate and flavorful salad, with many different types of ingredients. I would love to try this in Indonesia some day!

    ReplyDelete
  58. wow.... I want to try the "rujak" in Indonesia. Every place rojak is different. Even in Malaysia. Different places have different type of gravy. ^o^

    ReplyDelete
  59. donna-ffw: Thank you, Donna :) It's definitely a healthy dessert!

    burpandslurp: You are welcome, Sophie!

    jenn: Hahaha… thanks, Jenn! Glad to share my local food :)

    thenomadgourmand: Hehehe… thanks, Becky! Yup, each rujak has their own unique taste :)

    joie de vivre: Thanks, Joie :)

    ReplyDelete
  60. angele: Come… come visit me in Indonesia and I will bring you around to try rujak :)

    livie: Hopefully, you will find it soon ;)

    passionate eater: Hi Passionate Eater, welcome to my blog :)

    food paradise: Wow.. interesting to know that the gravy of rojak are different at each places :)

    ReplyDelete
  61. you know, I've never had a fruit salad with a sauce, buut I really like the way that looks!

    ReplyDelete
  62. matzoball: Hi Matzoball, welcome to my blog! Oh... You gotta try fruit salad with sauce, it's yummy :)

    ReplyDelete
  63. Thanks for the interesting information! That dish is very intriguing...

    Congrats on the award!

    cheers,

    Rosa

    ReplyDelete
  64. rosa yummy yums: Glad to share about the Indonesian fruit salad :)

    ReplyDelete
  65. O yes! I have eaten this. :)

    Beautiful post.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Your rojaks are so different from Msia !

    so colorful and looks so fruity and fresh. the stone banana looks really interesting, wonder if its hard as stone ?

    ReplyDelete
  67. laveena: It tasted yummy, right? Do you have this kind of fruit salad in India? I know there's Indian rujak quite popular in Singapore and Malaysia, is it originally come from India?

    BSG: Yup, the banana stone is hard like raw potato/carrot and can't be eaten eventhough it's ripe :)

    ReplyDelete
  68. This looks so tasty - especially the sauce.

    Congrats on your award.

    ReplyDelete
  69. we called it rojak buah.....
    the sauce.....
    looks like same but it change by the seller.

    they have their own recipe

    ReplyDelete
  70. That looks good...so refreshing. I wanted to grab a fork and dig in!
    Okay, bring on the fruit salad.
    ~ingrid

    ReplyDelete
  71. I wouldn't be surprised - there is a giant Asian market somewhere in Virginia not far from here. Maybe it could be one of the many weekend outings J and I are planning.

    ReplyDelete
  72. pam: Thanks, Pam :)

    pisang goreng: Sounds interesting, definitely will try someday :)

    inggrid: Hehehe… *hand in a big plate of rujak*

    livie: Wow, that’s cool! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  73. Hi Selbi,

    Yes the Rujak I tried was delicious.We don't have a version of fruit salad here. Vendors sell cut fruits on the road, but not like a salad and with no dips or sauces. Maybe they came up with this type of Rujak in Singapore to cater to Singapore Indians' taste buds. :)

    ReplyDelete
  74. laveena: Oh... so the Indian rojak isn't originally from India :) What kind of cut-fruits do the vendor in India usually sell?

    ReplyDelete
  75. They usually sell watermelons, pineapples and papayas. We also have a lot of juice stalls on the road which are more popular. The best and most unique is the sugar cane juice, garnished with lemon drops and masala. :)

    ReplyDelete
  76. laveena: Ah... yes, sugar cane! I remember you told me that :)

    robin: Indeed! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  77. I like the way they sell, prepare and serve the Rujak. Old School, which I hope many will not be loss in time and for better profits.

    The Rojak in Malaysia differs from Indonesia. And even Malaysia, it differs from state to state and stall to stall. Hard to say which is the best one. It would be a matter of choice.

    ReplyDelete
  78. jason wong: Hi Jason, nice to see you in here :) True.. true, same as like here in Indonesia, for the rujak buah, it's kinda differs from one province to the other province.

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin Related Stories Widget for Blogs